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IPv6

Discussion in 'Computer & IT Forum' started by chococheese, May 16, 2010.

  1. chococheese

    chococheese New Member

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    I am not sure if you guys are familiar with this topic but it has been a concern since the internet began taking off back in the 80s. It is a common topic discussed among IT professionals like myself. IPv4 is the current and most widely used internet layer, but the problem is that IPv4 is 32 bit and provides for about 2^32 (around 4 billion supposedly) unique IP addresses. Well as you probably know, the internet is always growing at a fast rate and it is inevitable that we will eventually run out of IP addresses. This is very similar to ESNs used with CDMA mobile phones in the US. A unique ESN is assigned to every CDMA mobile phone and because of the limitations of 32 bit numbering, ESNs are running out. A new system has been adopted to replace ESNs since then. Most end-users probably don't even think about this, but the topic of IPv4 exhaustion has come up once again recently. This is because many networking companies and experts (such as Cisco) have estimated that we will actually run out of IP addresses sometime around late 2010 or during 2011. The most practical way around this is to switch to IPv6 which is 128 bit. This will allow for up to 2^128 IP addresses which is a massive improvement over IPv4. (That would give us enough unique IPs that we would technically no longer have to use NAT routers.) IPv6 is currently still not very widely in use but it is most likely that most ISPs will begin issuing IPv6 addresses in the near future. All networked devices will eventually need to convert fully to IPv6 or use an IPv6 to IPv4 gateway as the two systems are not directly compatible. Most software and hardware companies are claiming that this transition won't be too much of a hassle for the consumers because most hardware will be upgradeable to IPv6 with a firmware patch and most software will receive an update. Hopefully then we won't have to go out and buy new hardware. Most software and hardware being sold now is already IPv6-ready including all current major operating systems. I would like to add the IPv6 addresses are much more complex and are longer (due to its 128 bit nature) than IPv4 addresses. Here is an example of an IPv6 address 2001:0db8:85a3:08d3:1319:8a2e:0370:7334

    Anyways, that's what I have to say about IPv6 right now. Its a pretty interesting thought that we have almost exhausted all of our current IP addresses. What do you guys think about this topic?
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  2. Old Admin

    Old Admin Administrator

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    Its an interesting subject indeed, i remember talking about it with some one years ago when i was "into" computers a little more and its amazing that we are running out at such a rate, I suppose its the same as anything else in this work at the moment and as you've already mentioned about the telephone numbers , in the UK quite some years ago (I was still a kid) the UK had to add another number to their landlines because of the rapid growth of the home telephone, Mainly because City's were running low on certain numbers so they introduced the number 1 as the second digit.

    The day this happened was 16th April 1995 and was named 'PhONEday' , Same precipices but with this IPv6 obviously on a much larger scale. IP addresses will certainly be a pain in the back side when they are that long for sure
  3. chococheese

    chococheese New Member

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    They had to add another digit to the phone numbers?
    Over here in the US, the first 3 digits of the phone number make up the area code. In more densely populated areas (such as where I live) they have had to overlay 2 different area codes one area because they used up all the numbers with the first area code combination.

    And yes, IP addresses will be a pain when they are that long. At least they are fairly easy to memorize at their current length lol.
  4. Old Admin

    Old Admin Administrator

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  5. chococheese

    chococheese New Member

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    Ah ok. They must use a lot of area codes in the UK then. We haven't had to add an extra digit yet, we have just had to add extra area codes to certain areas, mostly due to the rise of mobile phones the past 15 years.
  6. rvitgroup

    rvitgroup New Member

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    hello

    this is very interesting article thanks for this. Are IPv6 provide help in better web designing and development or internet security.
  7. jaikanth12

    jaikanth12 Member

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    Nice post , I was not knowing about IP V6 , Thanks for sharing the information.
  8. fizzer

    fizzer Member

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    I came across this topic earlier also. At present we are using ipv4 and slowly moving towards ipv6, as ip address are becoming sparse.
    I hope ipv6 ips' doesn't become sparse soon :0
  9. nestrellejohn

    nestrellejohn New Member

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    I'm not familiar with this,and now I read your post you give me an idea about this IPV6,nice post.
  10. horrerbaba

    horrerbaba Member

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    I have Windows XP SP2 and Intel LAN card can i use IPV6 services.
  11. devileye

    devileye Active Member

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    thanks for sharing.actually i did not about IPV6 service.basically i am new in this world.
  12. raghunand

    raghunand Member

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    Its really great information, I think it is more difficult to configure for systems.
  13. Simion

    Simion Member

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    Thanks for sharing such a nice and useful information.

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